Shirley Brown, your local Coquitlam REALTOR®

(604) 939-6666

What Buyers Don’t Want to See in Your Backyard

When you put your home up for sale, you want it to look its best to potential buyers. That’s why you clean, tidy and de-clutter every room.


Some sellers, however, miss the backyard. You need to pay just as much attention to that space as you do to the interior of your home.


The backyard is as important a living space as the family room. To some buyers, even more.


Buyers want to see an attractive backyard space, with the grass cut and the hedges trimmed. The more neat and tidy you can make it, the better.


Be sure to sweep walkways and wipe down patio furniture.


Also, watch out for the following things that buyers do not want to see:


  • Bags of garage and other waste.


  • Doggie do-do. (Be sure to stoop and scoop!)


  • Rakes and other tools piled in the corner.


  • Cluttered and disorganized storage sheds, pool huts and other

    backyard structures.


  • Weeds in the flower beds.


  • Items stored underneath the deck.


  • Hoses not stowed neatly.


  • Electrical outlets and water faucets that don’t work.

    These are not difficult issues to fix. Doing so will positively impact the impression the buyer gets of your backyard.


    Do you have a backyard that shows particularly well in the summer? Here’s a tip: Take pictures. Those photos will help buyers be able to appreciate how it looks should you list your home in the winter.


    Want more tips on making your home show well so that it sells fast?


     Call today. 


    Shirley Brown


    (604) 671-1060








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Home safety is more than locked doors and alarms 



When it comes to home security, most homeowners think about door locks and alarms. These are, of course, very important. However, there is also a lot you can do around your property to prevent the possibility of a break-in.

 

One important part of home security is outdoor lighting. Your home doesn't need to be lit up like a baseball diamond at night, but your exterior lighting should illuminate your yard enough to be a deterrent to burglars.

 

Some burglars hide around the property and wait for someone to arrive and open the door so they can use that opportunity to force their way into your home.

Security experts suggest that you walk around your property and look for areas where someone could hide, such as behind tall shrubbery like a cedar hedge or behind a tool shed. Make sure these areas are well lit.

 

Pay particular attention to lighting around exterior doors, especially the back door.

 

Home security experts also recommend that exterior lighting be installed with a timed dimmer. The lights can then be set to cast a bright light in the early evening, and then a dimmer light throughout the rest of the night.

 

Lights installed with motion detectors can also be effective in certain areas. The sensors will cause the light to turn on or brighten when someone comes onto that part of your property. Generally, thieves will flee as soon as they see a light turn on.

 

Do you hide a spare key under the front door mat or in a flower pot? No matter how clever you think you are, experienced thieves know all the common hiding places. So, if you need to have a spare key available, put it in a small combination lock box and hide the box. That way, if a burglar finds the box, he still won't be able to open it and access the key.


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